​Unique bar lives up to hype seven months after opening 

In June, I had the pleasure of going to Blyth and Burrows on Exchange St. just before it opened to the public a few days later. The hype of the bar blew through Portland last spring like a tornado. As details emerged, locals were intrigued by its well-thought-out historical theme and especially by its secret door leading to a different bar downstairs. 

I waited a while to head back to the popular locale, wanting to get through the initial excitement of its presence in the Old Port and giving it a little time to normalize. Still, I couldn’t forget about the insane amount of buzz it had generated over the summer. Because that ballyhoo was so crazy, there was a part of me that actually expected to be disappointed when I returned. It was too much to live up to, I figured. 

One concern I’d had – that it would be overcrowded and impossible to navigate – was put to rest immediately. Yes, it was busy, but not to the point of overcrowding. We took seats at the bar on the upper level and were promptly given menus and some water. The menus were mostly new from when they had opened, so I took careful inventory of what was now available, looking for a beer or cocktail to get the night started.

After asking about the rotating taps and taking more time than we should have to choose a libation, we made our decisions. I went with Agave Navidad – sage infused tequila, Blackstrap Rum, mezcal, roasted pineapple, lime, orange citrate. She decided to get Zuzu’s Petals – Stroudwater Vodka, Genepy, Cappelletti, cranberry,  rosemary, lemon, bubbles.

The food menu was small and focused on small plates, but there were several that caught my attention. I wasn’t interested in raw items, but that left both hot and cold dishes from which to pick. Before we could finalize our decisions, the bartender slid the drinks over. My cocktail was fruity with a permeating, but not overwhelming, mezcal smoke that I enjoyed. She found her drink’s flavors odd and quite tart. I agreed, but mostly liked it.

We sipped away and made our final choices on food. I ordered the Charbroiled Oysters – Old Bay, breadcrumbs, butter – and Korean Short Rib Bao – napa cabbage, jalapeno, kimchi. She went for Poke Bao – green onion, sriracha, jalapeno, tuna, sesame seed – and Goat Cheese and Honey – herbed chevre, maple pecans, local wildflower honey, crostini.

Before the plates we ordered came out, we each received a complementary bite from the chef and shortly thereafter, both of our Bao orders made their appearance. We each had three soft, doughy buns that looked like perfectly shaped tacos made of clouds. Hers was darker, mine light. I took a bite and loved it. There was a moderate spice, though nothing painful. A light sweetness rounded out the delicate, tender meat. It was a great start.

As I took my second bite, Mrs. Portlandeater nearly fell off her seat. She repeated the the words “oh my god, this is so good” about five times while eating her first bao. She was mesmerized by the spicy tuna in the bun, eating it while also showering it with praise. She followed up her initial thoughts by letting me know she would need to eat them again in a few weeks, and added that it might have been the best thing she’d eaten all year.

Once the buns were nearly done, the rest of our order came out. I went for the goat cheese, smearing it on one of the crostini. It was a little thin for spreading and broke in two as I attempted it, but I persevered, creating a duo of smaller open-faced sandwiches out of it. Crunchy, sweet, and cheesy, it was an excellent snack with lots of flavor which was only aided by the addition of pomegranate seeds and a little roe.

With cheese done, I dug for an oyster. I had been offered a off-menu version, but took the more traditional ones. Upon consuming the first shucked shellfish, I was happy with the choice. They were mildly seasoned, but as is often the case with seafood, I enjoyed savoring its natural flavor. I consumed all four of my bivalves, relishing the straightforward manner of preparation immensely.

My oysters were eventually gone, but I was still a little hungry. She decided to order a Prosecco, so I went back to the food. I quickly picked out the Mushroom Pate – North Spore Mushrooms, seasonal pickles, crostini. It didn’t take long before it came out with a large log of the pate itself, honey, housemade mustard, and a pickled cauliflower. 

Not wanting to break my bread again, I was careful about putting a pat of pate on it. I took a bite and felt it was tasty, but relatively weak. Wanting to jazz it up a bit, I threw on some mustard. The second bite was amazing, assisted by one of the best mustards I’d had in recent memory. A little honey made it even better as the mushroom honey mustard spread created a combination of flavors that made my mouth happy.

Our food and drinks were eventually finished and we were ready to call it quits. Our bill came to about $91 before tip. All of our items were between $7 and $14.  That was also the range of food prices on the menu as a whole aside from oysters at $15 per half dozen. We paid and made our way out, drifting into the cold, Maine night.

Blyth and Burrows turned my expectations upside down. I expected little and got everything. The drinks were solid, the food even better and the atmosphere as good as any around. The establishment is comfortable, looks really sharp, and feels like a place one could happily hang out in for hours. My two hopes are that next time I go I’ll spend some time in The Broken Dram downstairs and that at some point my wife will stop telling me how great her bao was. 

Stay hungry.

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​Pictures from the Wild Game Dinner at Little Giant

On Tuesday, November 28, Little Giant held a Wild Game Dinner and I was lucky enough to be invited to try it. The six-course dinner had beverage pairings included with each course and were offered a starter cocktail of cognac with sherry, lemon, and fresh nutmeg which was a great entry into the night. Here now are some pictures from that amazing meal.

Wild Maine Belon Oyster – boar chicharron, fresno chili, raw honey vinegar paired with Mas Peyre “Le Demon de Midi” Rancio Sec

This was actually the first raw oyster I’d ever eaten in my life. I know, I know…

After the oyster was down the hatch, we drank a little beer from the shell.

Rabbit Liver Pate – cranberry relish, hazelnuts, mustard paired with Orion’s Bow – pasubio, apricot, lemon, pineapple

This was served on local sourdough. And the drink was utterly delicious. 

Venison Loin – smoked turnip puree, pickled blueberries, crispy leeks paired with Henriques & Henriques 2000 Boal Single Harvest

I haven’t had that much venison in my life, but this was the best one by far – not even remotely gamey, extremely tender, and so flavorful. It was a total hit at the table.

Duck Ham – beets, orange, spiced pistachios, tarragon yogurt paired with Patience Reward – old tom gin, cocchi, dolin rouge, lemon

The duck was solid, but so were the beets which were a definite key to this plate.

Cassoulet – smoked boar, quail confit, rabbit sausage paired with Arnaud de Villeneuve Tresmontaine “Tabacal” Rancio

This stew was meaty and all parts were really tasty. I honestly can’t decide which part was my favorite.

Indian Pudding – candy cap mushroom ice cream, pepita brittle paired with Unreachable Horizon – dolin rouge, smith + cross rum, coffee

Dessert was amazing. And that coffee in the drink was Allen’s Coffee Brandy. Welcome to Maine!

Little Giant is always great, but this meal was really fun. If they ever offer something like this again, I highly recommend it!

Stay hungry.

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​Historic location, fine drinks, and bold flavors define new eatery 

I was invited to Bolster, Snow & Co. at 747 Congress St. this week for a complimentary meal in return for an honest review. Having opened last month, it was on my list of places to go soon, and just a few weeks ago, we actually had reservations, but decided to stay in for the night instead. Needless to say, I was enthusiastic about my visit.

The restaurant, with dinner 6 nights a week and brunch on weekends, sits in The Francis, a newer 15-room hotel in the Mellen E. Bolster House – recently restored and now officially a historic building. From the outside, it exudes a character produced by many structures in the area, with high-end beauty and limitless charisma. The interior continues the experience, as the renovation preserved the original detail, creating a warm atmosphere with lounge areas, bar, and main dining room.

We were seated and began looking for a drink. Wines by the bottle or glass in addition to significant beer and cider options comprised the majority of the menu. However, the half dozen signature cocktails at the top demanded my attention. Amaretto, rum, gin, and vodka based libations were available and I chose the Honey Buck – Stroudwater Vodka, lemon juice, ginger syrup, honey ($12). Mrs. Portlandeater went with a glass of Sauvignon Blanc ($11).

When ordering drinks, we were told by our waitress that they ask for the entire food order at once. We got to deciding our full meal from the modest selection which had choices of snacks, apps, and entrees. I spotted a number of starter types that looked good and suggested ordering three snacks ($6 each or 3 for $15). My wife agreed and we chose Parsnip Chips – herbs, togarashi, Deviled Eggs – truffle, and Fried Pickles – chipotle aioli.

In addition to the snacks, I added an app to our starters, the Broccoli – almonds, herbs, lime, sesame seeds ($12). For our entrees, she went with Fettuccine – lobster, tomato, pickled finger chili, breadcrumb, basil ($33) – and I chose the Pappardelle – squash, radicchio, walnuts, bacon, sage ($23). I thought the order to be a good sampling of the available offerings.

Our drinks came out and I tried a sip of mine. Its flavors left me reeling. The citrus was strong with perfect sweetness and just a touch of the ginger. It was truly delicious. I had my wife take a swig and she confirmed, expressing some regret that she had ordered wine instead. I had to make a conscious decision not to drink it all in one fell swoop.

Bread and oil came out side-by-side with our broccoli. It was a salad along the lines of something you might expect at a Thai restaurant. Fresh and crunchy, the lime was most potent in every bite and I thought it to be brilliant. Citrus goes a long way in a salad and it created a powerful punch of flavor with the king of gorgeous green vegetables. The sesame added a follow-up of nutty goodness to it.

Following the broc, we received the snacks. I started with the deviled eggs, consuming half of my first one. As a connoisseur of the evil eggs, I know a good one when I taste one and these were magnificent. They were relatively traditional, but the truffle took them to another level and there was no shortage of that awesome flavor.

Fried pickles were provided as spears which I always find to be a brave play. Combined with the aioli, they were what I expected – quite tasty and a reminder of other similar local offerings that I enjoy. The parsnip chips were crispy and sweet. I didn’t get any of the togarashi or herbs, so I’m not sure if they were just too subtle or totally nonexistent, but the chips were still a suitable appetizer.

Entrees came out and, though we were a little full, we were ready to try another course. My pappardelle was creamy and dotted with the ingredients listed on the menu. There was a lot going on with many flavors coming together, different from the previous items we tried which were more focused on a killer ingredient or two. It had a little something for everyone – crunchy nuts and sweet squash were my favorite, but the bacon certainly didn’t hurt.

She worked on her pasta, the sauce for which was tomato based. I preferred mine, but she liked the fett which was a bit spicy and had a fair allotment of the sea’s greatest crustacean. Toward the end of the meal, we gave each other a knowing glance. The pasta was solid and its taste made a really good meal, but I was also particularly impressed with ribbons themselves. They were ultra fresh, tender, and satisfying.

All our food was done and we agreed to look at a dessert menu. There were three items and I was tempted by the cranberry eclair that we were “warned” was on the tart side, but I just didn’t think I could fit anymore in me. We passed up the opportunity for one last treat in favor of asking for the final tab. Our stay was coming to an end, but the thought of that eclair was left lingering in my brain.

After my first full meal at Bolster Snow, I was impressed. They offer bold flavors, shining combinations, and take some simple contemporary items and add just a touch of their own hand in them. Basic deviled eggs with truffle? A total winner. Broccoli salad with a hit of lime? Stunning. A vodka lemon cocktail with hints of honey and ginger? An easy-going-down concoction. Try them for drinks and snacks if you want, but I think you just might end up staying for dinner.

Stay hungry.

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This is the new restaurant in Portland where spicy food actually is

The entrance to Con Tu Bot is nondescript. The purveyor of Vietnamese rations has self-adhesive mailbox letters affixed to the window next to the door which indicate their name. The accents are included, but impossible to comprehend without an ability to read Vietnamese. Their hours – 5-10 Thursday through Monday – are posted just below that.

Having opened over the summer, the restaurant, which Google translates to “dude” in English, is part of a growing and magnificent food scene on Washington Ave. The smallish interior, with counter seating and several tables, has a bit of New York City vibe with sparse decor and two large garage doors that run the width of the restaurant. It looks like someone just threw a kitchen and dining area into a random empty space – not that that’s a bad thing.

A waitress gives me the option of sitting at the counter or the one available table which will need some cleaning. Because of my left-handedness and the inevitable elbow jab to anyone sitting to the left of me, I wait for the table while the server cleans it. It’s ready shortly after my wife arrives from parking the car. We settle in with cups of water and get to scoping out the menu.

Headers on the food list include Noodles, Add-ons, Sides & Snacks, and Sweets. On the back, I find some drink options – beer, wine, sake. The menu is relatively small and neither of us are up for a drink due to an early morning of physical activity on the horizon. In passing up a beverage, I also notice that the menu plainly states that the restaurant uses an abundance of cilantro and peanuts. I suppose that to be a good start.

Items with one pepper next to them are spicy; two indicates very spicy. I like spice, but find it tough to pass up a good bowl of pho and decide on the Pho Ga – house style chicken pho. In addition to the the Vietnamese noodle soup, I also choose Goi Cai Bap – cabbage salad w/ red onion, chilis, peanuts, fish sauce, and lots of herbs. That has one peppper next to it.

Mrs. Portlandeater, who has occasional battles against spicy noodles, decides to try her hand at eating the very spicy Hu Tieu Xao – spiiicy stir fried rice noodles w/ Cinese broccoli, scallions, many chilis, peanuts, and red eye brown sauce. I assume the triple “i” and italics in the first word of the description indicate a sort of seriousness in regards to exactly how spicy it is. It’s actually the only available two pepper item on the menu.

My requisite bowl of herbs to go with my pho is delivered. Thai basil, sprouts, lime, and about four tiny, thin slices of peppers – serrano maybe? – are on the plate. Shortly thereafter, our meal comes out. I had requested the cabbage first, but it hardly matters. My noodles need to cool a bit anyway. I gawk at my salad momentarily, admiring the hefty sum of cilantro and peanuts on it. The menu didn’t lie.

With my first bite, the salad emanates salt, vinegar, and heat. The veggies are fresh and the herbs add mountains of flavor. The peanuts are a great crunchy topper. Another bite tells me a little less salt might be better, but I’m not overwhelmed by it; I expected a fair amount of sodium from the fish sauce. A half dozen bites in and my mouth starts to burn. I’m sweating a little.

I power through about half the salad and stop to recover. My wife, having eaten several bites of her noodles, tells me her mouth is on fire. I can only imagine since hers is supposed to be significantly spicier than mine. I am able to finish my salad, but again, my mouth is burning and I relax with sips of water – an absolute non-solution for a scorched mouth.

Eventually, I muster up the strength to begin eating my Vietnamese noodle soup. It’s not as big as others I’ve had, but it’s heartier with lots of meat and noodles. I throw in everything on my herb plate which kicks it up a notch. I also drop a little hoisin and sriracha on top. As I’m digging in, my wife calls it quits on her plate. In the battle of Mrs. P vs. the noodles, noodles win. I ask if she would like to trade meals, wanting to test my own fortitude again the capsaicin-rich dish.

She loves the pho and I love the stir fry with its typical sweet flavors, but need a break after about a half-dozen bites. My wife is no wimp. These are some hot noodles. I carry on eating them, but stop regularly to recover. After about four rounds, I finish, but my perspiration is peaking. I eat the last few bites of the soup too and feel like I have done well.

Our meal comes to $31 before tax. There is no tipping. I know some other local restaurants have recently tried that method and it hasn’t worked out, but as a consumer, I find it excellent. It’s fast, simple, and avoids having to do math on a full stomach and – for those who are drinking – an inebriated brain. We pay and make our way out.

As I walk away from Cong Tu Bot, I am left with delight. I like spicy food that is actually spicy and that’s what they serve. It’s all very tasty too; the spice is just an added bonus. If you don’t like heat, there are items for you – primarily the pho, but you certainly don’t have to avoid going. Add in the interesting ambiance and this is a place I’ll be visiting again in the near future. It will be a great cold weather hideaway this winter. 

Stay hungry.

Hungry for more? Get notified whenever Peterpeterportlandeater releases a new blog entry by clicking the “follow” button on the right side of this page after entering your email address directly above it. Seriously, do it. What are you waiting for?

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This inviting eatery is sure your please your guests

I never have a quick answer about where to go when someone wants to go out to eat with us in Portland. There’s plenty of great reastaurants and lots and lots of very good ones. I rarely pick the most expensive or the cheapest even though some of those are my faves, trying to find the best balance of great food, atmosphere, and prices that won’t break the bank. 

A perfect place to take friends doesn’t really exist because everyone has different tastes, but the first thought that came to mind this time when friends said they were coming to Portland was a place I’d been looking to return to. Little Giant, opened earlier in the year on Danforth St., was a locale I had visited over the summer and needed to revisit. Last time, the scenery was relaxing, the food rock solid, and the drinks worth taking an Uber home for.

Mrs. Portlandeater and I got to the restaurant before our friends and were seated. It brought back memories of the warm atmosphere I remembered from the last time we were there. We started looking at the drink menu. She had heard so much about the Espresso Martini with rum, tandem coffee, and coffee brandy which the menu touted as the best. She was certain she wanted that. I was up for the Born to Run – vodka, lime, agave, clove, bitters – which sounded pretty boss.

When our counterparts arrived a few minutes later, we had our drinks and they ordered another Born to Run and Angel Eyes – rum, lime, grapefruit, pineapple gomme, blue. I loved my B2R which tasted like a slightly tart juice mixture. My wife’s martini was excellent – reminding me of a spiked coffee, because I suppose it pretty much was a spiked coffee. She indeed confirmed it as the best she’d had.

I’m not sure I knew I was ordering apps for the table, but I ordered some and no one asked for any others. I started with Little Biscuits – maple-whipped lardo, pepper jelly – and the Cheese Ball – made with blue cheese, aged cheddar, dried blueberries, toasted pecans. Then I threw in an Oyster Taco – cabbage slaw, chipotle tartar sauce, house-made tortilla – just for myself. We then each ordered our main courses individually. 

Our apps arrived and I jumped right in to the mix, taking half a biscuit into my palm. Smearing some lardo and jelly on top of it, I drove it toward my mouth. The herby, sweet, mildly spicy combination on top of the flakey biscuit provided quite a flavor combo and it was good – a bit more complex than standard biscuit fare. It was a starter I would want after a day of hard work. They were comfort food tailor-made to relax with.

On the other hand, the cheese ball – sweet, barely pungent, and crunchy – was party food. Perfect with my drink, or probably any drink, that little ball of love was as delicious as the day is long. I ate more than my share on the butterfly crackers it came with, seriously considering ordering a second when it was done. The oyster taco fit the bill too as the crunchy, fried seafood was pleasantly paired with the slaw and tarter flavors for a solid spin on both oysters and tacos.

Shortly after the apps were gone, we received our entrees. I had ordered the LG Burger – American cheese, pickled grilled red onions, iceberg lettuce, BBQ mayo. My buddy went with the Grilled Bavette – green beans, romesco, buttermilk onion rings. The ladies both were recipients of the Mushroom Agnolotti – winter squash, cranberry beans, house-made ricotta, Swiss chard, bread crumbs.

With the new food came another round of drink orders including a rosé, prosecco, and a Chuparosa – tequila, lime, grenadine, chile. As the waiter left, I grabbed my burger and took an initial bite. Fresh, juicy, and delicious, the burger was simple, but abundantly satisfying. Potato wedges on the plate were piled on top of each other like a game of Jenga and a bite revealed a nice potato that was as I remembered from my last visit.

As I ate my burger, I briefly took the opportunity to try Mrs. Portlandeater’s agnolotti which is a version of ravioli. The mushroom flavor was powerful and I thought it brilliant. Mushroom in pretty much any dish is a winner, but this one was so potent, I gave it extra points. We all worked on the meals until we were finished and decided it would be a good idea to order dessert.

Another drink, a coffee, two Mexican Chocolate Donuts with mocha pudding, whipped cream, and pretzel crumble, and Apple Pie with maple whipped cream completed the dessert order. I was only planning to have a single bite of donut, but when the surgared ring came out, sprawled upon the plate in a bath of pretzeled pudding with whipped cream nearby, I quickly changed my tune.

That first bite of donut was perfect. The whipped cream took the edge off the double chocolate which would have been too much for me without it. I liked the pretzel crunch which added some noise to the dish. My buddy found the apple pie a little doughy for his tastes and I agreed after trying a bite, but it wasn’t bad and the serving was particularly large compared to what I’m used to.

After three full courses, a magnitude of calories, and our fill of alcoholic beverages, it was time to say “goodbye”. The tab came to $233 before tip for four of us with eight drinks and lots of food. Little Giant continues to please. I love their ambiance and the food makes me smile. After a couple visits, I have a good feel for what they’re doing, and I like it. I’ll be returning to try more of their menu, reordering some favorites in the process, and quite possibly bringing new guests to check it out.

Stay hungry.

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​Some of the best lobster rolls around now available all year

For me, lobster only in the summer isn’t quite enough. That seems to be the feeling Bite Into Maine’s Sarah Sutton is looking to tap into as she opens Bite Into Maine Commissary at 185 US Rte. 1 in Scarborough tomorrow. The new counter service eatery with a dozen seats will be serving their very popular food truck rolls year round in addition to adding some novel items to the menu.

The location isn’t completely new to Sutton’s business as it’s acted as the kitchen for the food truck service for a while. But with a few renovations, the former prep-only space can now welcome walk-in customers looking for fresh lobster meat smooshed between fresh, doughy housing. Catering and large group orders will also be available.

Added to the standing food truck menu are some new melts without lobster and corn chowder. Still there are all half-dozen varieties of their famous lobster rolls for $17.95 apiece. There’s also clam chowder, sides, drinks, and whoopie pies to round out your lunch. And if you’re really in the spirit, there’s also branded shirts and hats for sale.

As a bit of a lobster purist, my past experiences with BIM only involve eating their Maine style lobster roll with mayo and chives, but the new commissary gave me the opportunity to try something new. After considering Connecticut – warm butter only, chipotle, and curry varieties of the sandwich, I decided wasabi style with “zingy” wasabi mayo was the ticket. I threw in a cup of the corn chowder for good measure.

I took the food to go. Once back at my lair, I dug into my chowder which was full of corn and potatoes. A little hot for my comfort, I put it aside after a couple of bites and moved onto the lobster. My first bite was a whirlwind of pleasure. The wasabi was as perfect as could be – just strong enough that you wouldn’t forget it was there, but not potent enough to cause nasal char.

While the roll was great with wasabi, it wasn’t lost on me that the fresh, sizable pile of lobster still held all its flavor. The combination of the two on a fresh, grilled roll was just brilliant together. I finished the roll, went back to the chowder to finish that, and was pleased with my work on both. It had been a great lunch.

My food came to just under $25 with tax. I couldn’t have been happier. The chowder was fine, but it’s hard to compare it to the extraordinary lobster sandwich that Bite Into Maine is known for. Head there starting tommorow for some of the best lobster around. Go ahead and get one of those whoopie pies while you’re there too. They are a notoriously great way to end a meal packed with Maine’s favorite seafood.

Stay hungry.

Hungry for more? Get notified whenever Peterpeterportlandeater releases a new blog entry by clicking the “follow” button on the right side of this page after entering your email address directly above it. Seriously, do it. What are you waiting for?

Feel free to email me at peterpeterportlandeater@yahoo.com with any thoughts, suggestions, criticisms, or otherwise helpful info or post your thoughts below. Also, like the Peterpeterportlandeater page on Facebook and follow @portlandeater on Twitter. You can also find over 50 articles archived at pppe.bangordailynews.com.

​This top Portland breakfast spot has a menu with cajun charm

With all the breakfast and brunch options in Portland, it’s hard to choose which is my favorite. However, one place that keeps me coming back somewhat regularly is Deering Avenue’s Bayou Kitchen. The restaurant with a solid cajun flair has a variety of options for the hungry customer and their laid back, “let’s get you fed” attitude makes for simple service done right.

I love the restaurant’s theme – think gumbo, jambalaya, and crawfish – which is a fun twist on the standard brunch menu, but their inventive daily specials and wall of hot sauce add exponentially to the experience. I regularly order one or more of the three items listed on the wall-hung chalkboard displaying both sweet and savory treats and a few dashes of hot sauce – minimally – are a requirement every time I am there.

As always, we were there for breakfast, and once again the specials got my attention right away. Yes, I really wanted the Homemade Banana Bread French Toast at the bottom, but after a hard workout I was thinking something a little more healthy might be a wise option. On top, I spied The Greek Omelet with homemade Greek chicken sausage, tomato, onion, feta, and topped with olive tapenade. It came with toast and a side and I felt it would probably meet my needs.

My wife ordered an Omelet with spinach, tomato, and onion and chose home fries and blueberry cornbread to go with it. I did eventually opt for the Greek omelet, and got the homies and standard cornbread after considering the jalapeno cheddar version which I remembered as excellent from my prior experiences consuming it.

After a brief chat with a gym friend who arrived unexpectedly only moments after us and touted the Huevos Rancheros as his favorite, we received our food. I appreciated the consistent, large heft of the omelets. Mine had an oval smattering of the tapenade on top. I was ready to get down to business and forked the first bite over to my mouth.

The omelet sported the right combination of meat, vegetable, and cheese. The olive tapenade was a winner. I find it is often hit or miss, but this one was really good. The only issue I had was with the sausage. It was flavorful, but I really needed some heat with it. Enter Lost Woods Hot Sauce. It’s a Maine original and one of the sauces that graces all the tables. A bit of that on the egg was all I needed to complete the protien-laden creation.

Several bites into the egg, I had to move to the potatoes and cornbread.  The “homies”, as they are affectionately named, were beautiful, sizable bites of spud with a nice seasoning, a thorough grilling, and acted as a perfect receptacle for ketchup, hot sauce, or a well-proportioned combination of both. Oh, they were quite good. And that cornbread? Wonderful every single time regardless of the variety ordered.

It wasn’t difficult to finish our food. We needed fuel and tasty nourishment is never tough to consume. Our tab came to around $25 before tax and tip which included a coffee. Quick, easy, tasty, and reasonably priced, Bayou Kitchen hits all the marks. They make simple food including cajun favorites that consistently satisfy and also offer items that shock and amaze – particularly those specials – which might just throw a wrench into your usual brunch order.

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